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A Game of Supply Chain Risk

By Susan Lacefield

Mars Inc. has found that games are an effective way to teach supply chain risk management and resiliency.

When the pet food, candy, and drink company Mars Inc. wants to start a discussion with internal or external supply chain partners about supply chain risk management and resiliency, it basically holds a game night.

Chris de Wolfe, director of risk management, admits that initially he was skeptical that card and board games could help launch a supply chain risk management program. But he has since found that simulation activities are the best way to identify pain points and open people’s eyes to the risks around them.

De Wolfe and Sean S. Murphy, CEO of the business continuity consulting company Lootok Ltd., described two of the games that they use during a breakout session at the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) 2018 Annual Conference. These games have been used both at local Mars sites as well as with the companies’ key vendors.

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Bringing play into the business world

Despite the occasional stuffed-shirt boss looking over my shoulder and saying “This isn’t playtime!” some of the best jobs I’ve ever had incorporate a level of playfulness, and the results have always proven to be effective.

A favorite exhortation among fast-food bosses is, “If you’ve got time to lean, you’ve got time to clean!” But a little leaning now and then, and even a little guided playfulness, can go a lot further towards getting employees actively engaged in a corporate goal than will any angry mandate.

Where employers and employees alike go wrong is falling into the trap of believing that work isn’t supposed to be fun. Sean Murphy, CEO and founder of Lootok, a crisis management and business continuity consulting and technology company, went into this business – which is normally as dry as a Prohibition-era liquor cabinet – with the idea of actually transforming it into something people actually want to do.

HUFFPOST

Read the full article with commentary from Sean Murphy on HUFFPOST.

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Debunking myth #5: Best-in-class BCM software exists

Will BCM software deliver on its promise of making your BCM program easier to run? Is it really possible for BCM software to eliminate the difficulties in running your program?

Yes, it can—but there’s a catch. It won’t address challenges that are unique to your program. Essentially, your problems need to be shared by every other customer of the software.

Download Best-in-class BCM software exists, the fifth myth in Lootok’s series on the five myths of business continuity management (BCM)!

Best-in-class BCM software exists
Myth #5: Best-in-class BCM software exists

See Myth #1: The plan is the promised land.
See Myth #2: You need a business impact analysis (BIA).
See Myth #3: The risk matrix measures risk.
See Myth #4: It gets cheaper and easier.

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Debunking myth #4: It gets cheaper and easier

Keeping a BCM program alive doesn’t get cheaper or easier over time. In this eBook, we’ll talk about why.

Download It gets cheaper and easier, the fourth myth in Lootok’s series on the five myths of business continuity management (BCM)!

It gets cheaper and easier
Myth #4: It gets cheaper and easier

See Myth #1: The plan is the promised land.
See Myth #2: You need a business impact analysis (BIA).
See Myth #3: The risk matrix measures risk.
See Myth #5: Best-in-class BCM software exists.

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Serious business play: Lootok to collaborate with Highline Games

Lootok stands apart from other consulting firms—not only in the depth of our experience, but also in our willingness to challenge conventional thinking about business continuity and crisis management practices. This has never been more true than today. We are proud to announce that Lootok is collaborating with Highline Games to explore how games and “gamification” can breathe new life into risk management programs and practices. Highline Games, co-founded by Eli Weissman and Anthony Litton of Grand Theft Auto and W.E.L.D.E.R. fame, will work with Lootok’s consulting and creative teams to bring gaming methodologies to such topics as BIAs, plan data entry, and program engagement.

Lootok | Highline Games | Logos
Lootok & Highline Games

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Debunking myth #3: The risk matrix measures risk

The risk matrix is a standard tool commonly used in risk assessments. It’s straightforward to use, and easy to explain. The only trouble is, the risk matrix doesn’t actually forecast or measure risk.

When used as a quantitative tool, the risk matrix is misunderstood. Our challenge as practitioners is to recognize the limitations of the risk matrix, so we can use it in a way that increases understanding of the threats around us. In this eBook, we explore how.

Download The risk matrix measures risk, the third myth in Lootok’s series on the five myths of business continuity management (BCM)!

The risk matrix measures risk
Myth #3: The risk matrix measures risk

See Myth #1: The plan is the promised land.
See Myth #2: You need a business impact analysis (BIA).
See Myth #4: It gets cheaper and easier.
See Myth #5: Best-in-class BCM software exists.

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Debunking myth #2: You need a business impact analysis (BIA)

Many of us business continuity management (BCM) professionals are convinced that a business impact analysis (BIA) is a “must-have” for any company. On top of that, we often believe the more information we gather, the better. But after the enormous effort to collect mountains of data and conduct endless interviews, we end up with little value to show for it.

Doing a BIA is expected of us, but do companies actually need a BIA? I guarantee that conducting an extensive BIA project is a quick way to exhaust your resources, stall your program agenda, and taint the reputation of your program. But if you’re willing to question why you’re doing a BIA, and then facilitate the process in a practical way for participants, you can maximize your investment. This eBook explores how to do this, and why it matters.

Download You need a business impact analysis (BIA), the second myth in Lootok’s series on the five myths of business continuity management (BCM)!

You need a business impact analysis (BIA)
Myth #2: You need a business impact analysis (BIA)

See Myth #1: The plan is the promised land.
See Myth #3: The risk matrix measures risk.
See Myth #4: It gets cheaper and easier.
See Myth #5: Best-in-class BCM software exists.

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Debunking myth #1: The plan is the promised land

As BCM professionals, we’ve long believed in the myth that a plan is our key to recovery during a disruption. Often, we hyper-focus on the plan as undeniable proof that the right actions will be taken in an incident. This is the worst possible approach. Learn why in our eBook, The plan is the promised land, the first in Lootok’s series on the five myths of business continuity management (BCM)!

The plan is the promised land
Myth #1: The plan is the promised land

See Myth #2: You need a business impact analysis (BIA).
See Myth #3: The risk matrix measures risk.
See Myth #4: It gets cheaper and easier.
See Myth #5: Best-in-class BCM software exists.

Read Post