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Lootok names Managing Director, Brian Collins

Consulting at the board and the C-suite levels require more than experience and expertise. Presence matters. Strength of conviction matters. This caliber of consultant is a partner who confronts the thorniest topics head-on and who can speak the language of today’s leaders. Lootok has found such a talent. It is with great enthusiasm and expectation that Lootok announces Brian Collins as Managing Director. Mr. Collins joins Lootok with more than twenty years of risk management experience across industries and sectors. Based in Washington, DC, he will lead the global crisis management practice.

Mr. Collins is a decorated Marine officer with awards for valor in combat and service. He has worked at the highest levels of government with General/Flag Officers, Assistant Cabinet Secretaries, and Ambassadors. He paired his extensive governmental experience with a master’s degree from Georgetown University and graduated from the Senior Executive Fellows program at the Harvard Kennedy School.

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A Game of Supply Chain Risk

By Susan Lacefield

Mars Inc. has found that games are an effective way to teach supply chain risk management and resiliency.

When the pet food, candy, and drink company Mars Inc. wants to start a discussion with internal or external supply chain partners about supply chain risk management and resiliency, it basically holds a game night.

Chris de Wolfe, director of risk management, admits that initially he was skeptical that card and board games could help launch a supply chain risk management program. But he has since found that simulation activities are the best way to identify pain points and open people’s eyes to the risks around them.

De Wolfe and Sean S. Murphy, CEO of the business continuity consulting company Lootok Ltd., described two of the games that they use during a breakout session at the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) 2018 Annual Conference. These games have been used both at local Mars sites as well as with the companies’ key vendors.

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Breaking the Business Continuity Mould

Breaking the Business Continuity Mould

Embrace the process, not the destination

Business continuity and crisis management is moving from its traditional roots and by-the-book implementation, to a much more disruptive—and much more effective—process. Business continuity planning has become more complex, nonlinear and inclusive of multiple third parties, and the growing ecosystem of cloud and as-a-service providers has moved much of the risk outside of the immediate control of the risk manager. This is all complicated by the inherent difficulty in getting buy-in and participation in what is often a project nobody really wants to be a part of.

It becomes even more complex when planners must prepare for a wider group of possibilities, which includes not only natural disasters, labor disputes and equipment failures, but cyber-disasters which are often not as well defined and even more unpredictable, and are based on environments and actors which have no physical boundaries.

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The Psychology of Risk

Over the past several years, psychologists, behavioral scientists and academics have helped to advance our understanding of human psychology and, specifically, how humans respond to high-risk and crisis situations. This research has highlighted how a lack of pre-crisis training and preparation may exacerbate risk and cause unnecessary errors during times of stress and uncertainty.

The good news is that these experts can also help us better understand the best ways for businesses to help individuals prepare and train for such situations so they can contribute positively to the risk management and crisis mitigation process.

But while the need for crisis and business continuity planning is clearly recognized by a wide swath of businesses and many endorse and utilize such programs, the degree to which companies and their risk managers have embraced the findings of what some call “the psychology of risk” is sorely lacking.

For the entire article please visit rmmagazine.com

Lootok Resiliency Summit: The best risk managers don’t do it alone

The best risk managers don’t do it alone

How can I ensure our internal stakeholders are properly trained on risk management? How can I make sure the quality of plans is consistent within a global organization? How do I get people to care when they’re facing limited resources, budget, and time?

This is what every global risk, crisis, and security leader asks—and they’re disappointed when I tell them there aren’t easy answers. There’s no magic pill that transforms someone into a thoughtful continuity planner or an informed risk management advocate. The fact is, it takes time to educate and train stakeholders on important initiatives, and effort to establish the processes and protocol that facilitate consistency. It also may mean giving people dedicated time (especially if they’re strapped for time already) to devote towards proper training and development.

 

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Lootok: Three must-know lessons from my last business continuity site visit

Three must-know lessons from my last business continuity site visit

I often serve as an extension of our client’s risk management team. Recently, I visited a client site to implement a continuity program focused on manufacturing recovery. Approaching new sites can be a challenge, particularly for recently established programs. I’m always reminded that first impressions—of people and of programs—are lasting, and it’s not easy to spark engagement and support from local teams. In my experience, here’s what works in winning them over…

 

 

 

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Press Release: ClearView named a leader in Gartner’s 2017 Magic Quadrant

Clearview

 

ClearView is proud to announce that it has once more been positioned in the Leaders Quadrant in Gartner’s July 2017 Magic Quadrant for Business Continuity Management Program Solutions, Worldwide.

CEO Charles Boffin comments, ‘We are delighted that we have once more been recognised as a leader in the market as we continue to focus on our core principles of delivering a sophisticated and functionally-rich platform in a way that makes it easy to use and intuitive for all users, irrespective of role in an organisation. We believe our continued placement in the Leaders quadrant demonstrates our ongoing commitment to remain a key player globally in this field.’

Gartner subscribers may download the full report here.

Read the full press release on clearview-continuity.com

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Lootok CEO to share a revolutionary approach to crisis and risk management at two industry events

See Sean Murphy speak at OSAC Crisis Management Forum and APTA’s Risk Management Seminar this August


Sean Murphy, CEO of the crisis management and business continuity consulting and technology company Lootok, will share his expertise and insights at two high-profile events this year. On August 7, he will present at the American Public Transportation Association’s (APTA) Risk Management Seminar in San Diego. Immediately following the APTA Seminar, Murphy will be a featured speaker at the U.S. Department of State’s Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC)’s Crisis Management Forum in Minneapolis on August 8 and 9.

The APTA Risk Management Seminar is the only risk management seminar dedicated to risk management professionals involved in transit risk management. This year’s agenda features new and creative thinking for risk managers—presenting cutting-edge concepts and challenges. With transportation and public entity risk managers at all levels of experience, the seminar includes several sessions on issues that transit risk managers face on a daily basis. Sean Murphy’s session will explore a modern approach to crisis and business continuity management that allows companies to maneuver in today’s complex world of threats.

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Press release: Lootok and Nettitude partner to provide cybersecurity and crisis management services

Nettitude logo

The threats impacting businesses today are complex, insidious, and almost always have an up or downstream impact on technology. Cyber attacks are also borderless and can impact core operations as easily as business partner and supply chain operations. Therefore, when companies look to increase their resiliency they must weigh equally their operational and technological vulnerabilities.

One challenge that many organizations face is that there is no single entity governing cybersecurity and crisis management. With different reporting structures, separate budgets, and uncoordinated planning, they struggle to stay in sync. This partnership takes aim at breaking down those silos and helping organizations to get an honest and holistic view of their risk landscape.

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Press release: New leadership team paves the way for the future of Lootok

For more than 10 years Lootok has pushed the boundaries of traditional crisis management and business continuity (BC). “I launched Lootok with the singular vision of doing BC differently,” said Lootok CEO, Sean Murphy. “Global volatility and increased competition have escalated the need for companies to prepare for disruptions. While everybody knows that they should have a BC program, nobody wants to do the work. BC is only important when it’s too late, and when an incident does occur, any data and plans that have been collected typically remain untouched.”

Lootok continually confronts these challenges by offering fresh points of view on industry standards and new ways to transform programs to meet today’s highly networked environment. Sean Murphy explains: “I knew that BC was an essential part of business. The negative returns I so often saw were not the result of BC itself, but rather how it was implemented. At that point, I saw a major opportunity in going beyond the cookie-cutter approach and offering something of lasting value.”

With this goal, Lootok based its services on a deep understanding of industry expertise and interdisciplinary sciences.  Why integrate interdisciplinary sciences? It is a simple answer, according to Sean: “We get better results. Through integrating cognitive sciences, gamification, and branding concepts we capture higher-quality data, buy-in at all levels of the organization, and sizable costs savings through self-service and automation.”

2017 marked a reflective period in Lootok’s history, where the company restructured areas of the organization to yield even greater innovation and sharpened its services to Lootok clients. Lootok is excited to announce that there are four changes in its talent pool that set the stage for this evolution. 

New Lootok Leadership Team

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Crisis management: fly the plane or fix the problem, don’t do both

Learning to either manage the crisis or run the company, but not do both, is a hard lesson for most executives, as they want to do it all. Executives achieve their position through hard work, overcoming extreme obstacles, success, confidence, and leadership. It becomes difficult to let go of the organizational reigns to focus on the crisis. Likewise, it is just as difficult to let others manage a crisis while they focus on the organization. This post is a reflection of a number of executive crisis management trainings I facilitated where the executive (e.g., CEO, business unit president, segment leader) wanted to ‘fly the plane’ and ‘fix the problem.’

fix the plane

 

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How to bring crisis management back to the basics

This is a continuation of my Business Continuity Basics article.

Consider the Basics for Crisis Management Program - as with most initiatives and programs, we tend to over think when we design them. The basics reminds me of one of my favorite quotes from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, “Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

Let’s keep it simple: crisis management

When it comes to crisis management the majority of crisis teams need seven means to make timely and effective decisions based on applying judgment to available information. We need a command and control framework, critical information requirements (identification of gaps in our knowledge), intelligence, situation awareness, common operating picture, common ground, and intent.

Back to basics Lootok Crisis Management

 

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Join Lootok in Philly for RIMS 2017!

As you are making plans for the RIMS 2017 Conference in Philadelphia, make sure you don’t miss Lootok’s Sean Murphy and Jeremy Stynes speaking on Monday, April 24th. They will be exploring the psychology of risk, sharing innovative ways to market your program, and breaking down traditional myths of Business Continuity Management. All in our signature, non-conventional Lootok way. We hope you come and join us!

RIMS 2017: April 23-26th, 2017 | the Pennsylvania Convention Center | Philadelphia

Lootok Sessions on Monday, April 24 :
12:00 – 12:25 pm | Market Your Program Like a Product | Jeremy Stynes, President
1:00 – 1:25 pm | Five Myths of Operational Risk and Business Continuity Management | Sean Murphy, CEO
3:00 – 4:00 pm | Risk Shrink: Exploring the Psychology of Risk | Sean Murphy, CEO, Lootok; Hester Shaw, Internal Control Framework Director, GSK

Lootok Rims 2017 Philadelphia cheesesteak
Join Lootok for some juicy sessions on Business Continuity!

 

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Facilitating an exercise? Find out how to reel people in!

Last month, I showed up at a client’s manufacturing site to facilitate an annual tabletop exercise. The company had recently kicked off its crisis management and business continuity initiative, so I wasn’t surprised to walk in and hear several people ask what this meeting was about, and how long it was going to last.

It is commonplace within organizations to have initiative atrophy or program of the month syndrome. People are doing more with less. Everyone is highly skilled at prioritizing work and recognizing false positive initiatives. Crisis management and business continuity can quickly get categorized as a ‘not now’ or ‘postpone as long as possible’ project in this environment. Therefore, it is important for risk and security professionals to allow our stakeholders bring themselves into the program. We need them to want the program and value the work we need them to do.

In my experience, there are usually three different types of people sitting in the room.

First, you have your evangelists, or your program advocates—they’re often the ones leading the initiative or they’ve already experienced some kind of catastrophic event. On the other end of the spectrum are those who have already decided risk management is irrelevant, so they’re checked out and sighing loudly.

But almost everyone in between is a good corporate citizen who has showed up with a printed copy of their plan because they were told to. Other than the occasional email, they’re not used to thinking about risk. You can’t blame them for wanting to just get the meeting over with and get on with their lives.

This mindset, unfortunately, is not uncommon. Whether people are unaware of the program or struggle to understand its value, it’s important to recruit them as active participants. So what are we as risk management professionals to do?

Lootok facilitate an exercise
Facilitate a successful exercise! Reel people in!

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Crisis management expert, Eric Dezenhall, kicks off the BCI Author Series

The BCI is proud to introduce our first author interview with Eric Dezenhall on April 11th, 8:30-10:30 am, at the Harvard Club in New York City.

From Tiger Woods to Michael Jackson, Eric Dezenhall has been on the front line of high-profile crisis communications and public relations. Come hear his perspective on Trump vs Clinton, BP vs Goldman, fake news and much more. Eric is a world-renowned crisis management and public relationship expert with frequent appearances on NPR, CNN, FOX, CNBC, and MSNBC. He has written for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Business Week, the Los Angeles Times, and USA Today; is a regular contributor to the Daily Beast, Huffington Post and CNBC.com. Learn more about Eric.

Seating limited to 50 seats. Register now!

Eric Dezenhall

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Crisis Management, Business Continuity, and Entrepreneurship

This presentation was presented at the D.C. Analyst Roundtable. I was asked to speak on crisis management, business continuity, and how to run a program like a business. You can download the presentation from SlideShare.

yellow house

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Thomson Reuters: 2nd Annual Corporate Counsel Leadership Forum in NYC

Join me at the Thomson Reuters: 2nd Annual Corporate Counsel Leadership Forum. I will be moderating a panel on ‘The General Counsel’s Role in Business Continuity Management’. To register, contact 1-800-308-1700. Hope to see you there!

Thomson Reuters Conference NYC 2016

One of the sad realities of the “new normal” is the escalating specter of terrorism-related crises in the workplace. Though not exclusively tethered to data privacy concerns or security incidents, a business executive’s ability to manage unforeseen trauma is an essential (and largely unspoken) part of the modern day job description. This interactive workshop offers timely, practical, scenario-based coaching on how to handle the unforeseen at a moment of supreme hardship. Participants will walk away with a clear understanding of core tenets of business continuity management, as well as key techniques for coping with or better understanding terrorism’s ineffable vicissitudes.

Where: The Metropolitan Club
When: November 16, 2016, 1:45pm to 2:45 pm
Topic: Darkness Descends: The General Counsel’s Role in Business Continuity Management

 

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Lootok presents at the DC Analysts’ Roundtable

Join me at the DC Analysts’ Roundtable on November 14th!  I will be presenting on Business Continuity & Crisis Management.

The DC Analysts’ Roundtable is a collaborative body of practitioners in the fields of intelligence and risk analysis from the private sector and federal, state, and local agencies. The Analysts’ Roundtable promotes the professionalization of the intelligence and risk analysis communities through the sharing of best practices, information, and analytical training. Sign up by contacting DC.Analysts.Roundtable@gmail.com. Look forward to seeing you there!

Location: Lockheed Martin Global Vision Center Auditorium, 2121 Crystal Drive, Crystal City (Arlington), VA
Date: November 14, 2016, 12:30pm - 5:30pm
See full event details here.

DC Analysts Roundtable 2016

 

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Lootok presented at Continuity Insights 2016

Last week, Lootok presented with Matt Jarm from Mars Inc. about supply chain resiliency at the New York Continuity Insights Conference.

In our session, we covered the critical aspects of rolling out and maintaining a global supply chain operational risk – business continuity program.  Supply chain leaders are naturally gifted at managing risk, as it is part of their daily lives. But, supply chains are naturally dynamic (i.e., disruptive), which makes many of our traditional operational risk – business continuity techniques ineffective. Supply chain leaders need risk management techniques and tools to help them make decisions, solve problems, and communicate in complex environments.

Learning objectives covered:

  • Common pitfalls (i.e. too fast, too big) of risk and resiliency supply chain rollouts.
  • The necessary methodologies, tools, and roadmaps to be successful in today’s complex, nonlinear, supply-chain environments.

Download full presentation

Supply Chain Resilincy Lootok Continuity Insights 2016
Download full presentation

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Lootok presents at the Enterprise Risk Management Summit

Join me at the Enterprise Risk Management Summit in Las Vegas on November 2, 2016!

I will be speaking with Andrew Miller from ADP about linking reputation management, business continuity and crisis planning to strengthen risk resilience.

Where: Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas
When: November 2, 2016, 9:00am
What: Linking reputation management, business continuity and crisis planning to strengthen risk resilience

ERM conference 2016
We look forward to seeing you in Las Vegas!

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What is the best way to tell stories as means to communicate - Cliff Atkinson on Fresh Perspective

 

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How would a physicist approach risk management - Mark Buchanan on Fresh Perspective

 

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How to use Scenario Planning in Risk Management - Thomas Chermack on Fresh Perspective

 

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Gartner names ClearView a leader in its 2016 Magic Quadrant for BC software

Lootok is proud to announce that ClearView, our trusted software partner,  has been positioned in the Leaders Quadrant in Gartner’s July 2016 Magic Quadrant for Business Continuity Management Planning Software, Worldwide.

Gartner: Magic Quadrant

CEO Charles Boffin comments, “We are delighted that we have been recognized as a leader in the market as we continue to focus on our core principles of delivering a sophisticated and functionally-rich platform in a way that makes it easy to use and intuitive for all users, irrespective of role in an organization. We believe our transition from the Challengers to Leaders quadrants demonstrates our continuing commitment to remain a key player globally in this field.”

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Can a crisis make you a celebrity?

Picture of man speaking to the press
Ready or not.  Say, “Cheese!”

While artists, athletes, and performers struggle to make their mark in the public eye with a memorable act or viral moment, a different type of celebrity has been emerging on the scene - the spokesperson for a crisis.

Here’s a quick exercise to highlight the point:

Jeffrey Boyd, Lew Frankfort, and Stephen Hemsley. Do these names sound familiar?
If not, don’t feel bad. They are the CEO’s of Priceline.com, Coach, and UnitedHealth Group, respectively.

Now, how about the names Tim Cook and James Comey?
We can immediately recall them as the CEO of Apple and the FBI Director, respectively, feuding over a locked iPhone involving a federal investigation of the San Bernardino shooting.

The media diligently covered Cook and Comey’s debate for more than three months. During that time, both men emerged as stars in a cast of characters ranging from lawyers, judges, politicians, and even presidential candidates. The media and public tuned in to hear their perspectives on data privacy, security, technology, civil rights, and terrorism.

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Snowflake Syndrome: when should we be unique vs. boiler plate?

One of the challenges we have in risk management, crisis management, and security management is striking a balance between customized and standard solutions. Customized solutions and approaches tend to be more expensive now (implementation) and later (maintenance). However, customized solutions resolve specific requirements. Standard solutions tend to be cheaper, but we don’t get exactly what we want. Our challenge is balancing requirements and spend to get the most out of our budgets.

When is good good enough?

Jeremy Stynes, Lootok’s CCO / CTO, has coined a term he calls Snowflake Syndrome. Snowflake syndrome is when someone believes that they are so unique they demand special attention and design - but reality is ... they’re not special. They believe their project/initiative/program is one-of-a-kind, a snowflake. The challenge of the Snowflake Syndrome is rooted in people’s mental models. People can suffer from the syndrome when they confuse their personal uniqueness, or desire to be unique, with the organizational program they are responsible for. It can also come from working in organizational environments that lack standardization and procedures; therefore snowflake solutions are everywhere. It is easy to believe you are a snowflake when everything and everyone around you is a snowflake. Snowflake thinking can lead to overly complex (unique) design and processes. Anytime we see inconsistent design or costly overruns the snowflake syndrome is close by.

Snowflake
Snowflake syndrome

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Should global organizations have a global security operations center (GSOC)?

“How did you go bankrupt?”
“Two ways. Gradually, then suddenly.”

- Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

I was working with a head of risk management—the chief risk officer—at a global organization that does not have a GSOC. One night over dinner, I asked him why his organization didn’t have one, and suggested he spearhead the initiative. His response? “I’m not convinced we need one. The organization has always operated without a GSOC, so why start now?” He also said, “The reality is, we’re already doing it here and there. The system works fine. Let people do their thing.” Something that seemed so obvious to me and so unnecessary to him left me on the defensive and him on offense.

The reality is, if you’re a global organization, you need a GSOC—or some version of it. If you don’t have one, you will need to communicate the severity of the situation and get one. Allow me to illustrate the need for such capabilities so you can justify the business case to your leadership and board…

GSOC

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Does a centralized crisis management structure make sense?

My colleague Christopher Rivera attended an inter-agency exercise where he had a few heated discussions on the topic. He argued in favor of a decentralize model with centralize support (Lootok’s philosophy), whereas a number of his colleagues at the table argued for dedicated central crisis management team that did everything. His colleagues at the table believe in Power to Center, where Lootok believes in Power to the Edge.

The desire to centralize is our natural predilection to try to simplify things and codify procedures to create predictability and reduce errors. The problem with Power to Center, an autocratic centralized model, is that it requires control, prediction, time, and universal knowledge of everything. Unfortunately, control is not possible in complex adaptive environments where there are many independent actors. Control requires prediction as well adequate levers of manipulation. Both requirements are in little supply in the crisis environment. Time is always working against us in today’s global 24/7 environments. In global organizations, knowledge of the local environment and threat effects are necessary to be able to optimally manage and respond to a spectrum of threats. The centralize desire to take the human element out of everything, which is the most important factor in the equation, is almost irresistible.

In complex environments, orderly processes and centralized decision making are ineffective. We also can’t codify a set of procedures for a nonlinear complex event because we have to take the context into account. Independence and improvisation are essential. Decentralize structure (local, country, regional) works best when the threat is within the leadership command and control accountability and responsibility.

Centralized structure
Does a centralized crisis management structure make sense?

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Disaster Recovery for America interview on the Federal News Radio

I appeared on Federal News Radio and shared my thoughts on new approaches to risk management and how to develop an effective approach to business. You can stream the recording for free here: Interview with Sean Murphy

Look forward to hearing your thoughts and comments!

Sean Murphy on Federal News Radio
Sean on Federal News Radio

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Shaking Up the Status Quo: Innovations in Risk Management

Chris de Wolf (Mars) and I got back together in April at the RIMS’16 conference for an overwhelmingly well-received session where we talked about transforming the risk function from a program to a business.

“Shaking up the Status Quo - Innovations in Risk Management” gave us the opportunity to tell the story of how we reinvented risk management - business continuity. Long story short: We were looking for a better way.

 

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