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Bringing play into the business world

Despite the occasional stuffed-shirt boss looking over my shoulder and saying “This isn’t playtime!” some of the best jobs I’ve ever had incorporate a level of playfulness, and the results have always proven to be effective.

A favorite exhortation among fast-food bosses is, “If you’ve got time to lean, you’ve got time to clean!” But a little leaning now and then, and even a little guided playfulness, can go a lot further towards getting employees actively engaged in a corporate goal than will any angry mandate.

Where employers and employees alike go wrong is falling into the trap of believing that work isn’t supposed to be fun. Sean Murphy, CEO and founder of Lootok, a crisis management and business continuity consulting and technology company, went into this business – which is normally as dry as a Prohibition-era liquor cabinet – with the idea of actually transforming it into something people actually want to do.

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Read the full article with commentary from Sean Murphy on HUFFPOST.

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Contextual learning could soon replace traditional learning

Corporate training is big business. Last year alone, American organizations spent a whopping $70.65 billion on corporate training and associated administrative costs, based on data from Training magazine’s 2016 Training Industry Report. Most companies are willing to invest in the learning and development of employees because they must compete in ever-changing markets, which requires enhanced skills.

According to a McKinsey Quarterly survey, nearly 90% of organizations indicated that building on the capabilities of employees is a top priority. However, only around a quarter said that they can accurately measure the success of their learning programs in terms of improved performance. There seems to be a disconnect between investing in learning programs and having a direct understanding of the impact on the bottom line.

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Read the full article with commentary from Jeremy Stynes on HR Dive.

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Participatory learning dramatically improves employee career development

It’s a well-known fact that a strong corporate learning program is an effective retention tool.

By encouraging employees to actively participate, employees can better understand new concepts practically, rather than just absorbing a slew of information. Participatory learning can increase employee career satisfaction when it’s carried out correctly.

According to the National Institutes for Health, the very process of participating in any change activity can support workforce learning. A 2009 study conducted by E. Rosskam involved teaching employees new health procedures in order to improve safety. By using a shared platform where learners can interact and support one another, employees can perceive learning as something they own.

HR Dive talked with Sean Murphy, CEO of Lootok, a business continuity and crisis management firm with headquarters in New York City, about the concept of participatory learning. When employees buy in to active career development, this participation creates another layer in the experience.

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Read the full article with commentary from Sean Murphy on HR Dive.

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Press release: New leadership team paves the way for the future of Lootok

For more than 10 years Lootok has pushed the boundaries of traditional crisis management and business continuity (BC). “I launched Lootok with the singular vision of doing BC differently,” said Lootok CEO, Sean Murphy. “Global volatility and increased competition have escalated the need for companies to prepare for disruptions. While everybody knows that they should have a BC program, nobody wants to do the work. BC is only important when it’s too late, and when an incident does occur, any data and plans that have been collected typically remain untouched.”

Lootok continually confronts these challenges by offering fresh points of view on industry standards and new ways to transform programs to meet today’s highly networked environment. Sean Murphy explains: “I knew that BC was an essential part of business. The negative returns I so often saw were not the result of BC itself, but rather how it was implemented. At that point, I saw a major opportunity in going beyond the cookie-cutter approach and offering something of lasting value.”

With this goal, Lootok based its services on a deep understanding of industry expertise and interdisciplinary sciences.  Why integrate interdisciplinary sciences? It is a simple answer, according to Sean: “We get better results. Through integrating cognitive sciences, gamification, and branding concepts we capture higher-quality data, buy-in at all levels of the organization, and sizable costs savings through self-service and automation.”

2017 marked a reflective period in Lootok’s history, where the company restructured areas of the organization to yield even greater innovation and sharpened its services to Lootok clients. Lootok is excited to announce that there are four changes in its talent pool that set the stage for this evolution. 

New Lootok Leadership Team

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Lootok & ClearView: The next great duo to change history.

History has rewarded partnerships that have revolutionized the way people live, work, and even think for the better.

The next great duo to change history.


In the spirit of these pairings, Lootok is proud to announce that we will be selling ClearView software, as well as ClearView support, implementation, and consultancy services in North America.

Software alone is not a silver bullet; neither is consulting. Used properly, these two can revolutionize a program. That mutuality is the foundation for our partnership with ClearView. Lootok excels at program set up, training, awareness, and adoption. ClearView provides a best-in-class software that can grow with your program, while not overwhelming your users.

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