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What do dog food and risk management have in common? Lootok’s Demand Model®

“Nothing happens until someone sells something to someone.” Thomas J. Watson (1874–1956), Chairman and CEO, IBM

Would a company sell a product or service that no one wanted? It’s an absurd question with a simple answer: absolutely not. You need demand. People have to want what you’re offering. At Lootok, we apply this same basic principle to risk management, business continuity, and crisis management programs.

Of course, most practitioners—people like you and me—see the value and the importance of their role in such services. But if you go outside this tight circle, demand quickly wanes. Rather than march to a linear project plan or industry standard, let demand drive the pace of progress.

Before you rollout, change, or update a global program, begin by assessing demand. Organizations tend to prefer immediate success and tangible artifacts (e.g., risk assessment or business impact analysis), but if you think of your program as a business, assessing demand would be the first thing you would do.

Out of this concept came Lootok’s Demand Model®, developed and refined over the past decade.

Lootok Demand Model

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Risk Management’s Sweet Spot

Chris de Wolfe, global director of risk management at Mars Inc., shares his challenges of getting the global risk management program at Mars up and running.

“The CRM group had a lot to offer but was severely underutilized, which led to high insurance premiums, a high risk profile, and a significantly reduced resiliency and recovery capability,” Chris said.

Reflecting on how Mars as a business became a major success, de Wolfe decided that he needed to market and promote his own department in the same way. Partnering with Lootok, a risk management consultancy firm, he developed a strategy to engage with the employees in a fun yet educational way. He devised a 5- to 10-year plan, broken into 12- to 18-month strategies and individual project plans by mapping out all of the products and services that risk management offers. He conducted a perception survey and drew up a program based on the ABCs of risk management.

“The ABCs allowed people to understand that risk management not only provides insurance, but it also ensures that the business continues,” said de Wolfe.

Sean Murphy, CEO and founder of Lootok, said of de Wolfe:

“I’ve known Chris for 10 years and what differentiates him is that he treats his program as a business. He had a good program before but he wasn’t satisfied with it so he completely revamped it and is now reaping the benefits.”

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Lootok & ClearView: The next great duo to change history.

History has rewarded partnerships that have revolutionized the way people live, work, and even think for the better.

The next great duo to change history.


In the spirit of these pairings, Lootok is proud to announce that we will be selling ClearView software, as well as ClearView support, implementation, and consultancy services in North America.

Software alone is not a silver bullet; neither is consulting. Used properly, these two can revolutionize a program. That mutuality is the foundation for our partnership with ClearView. Lootok excels at program set up, training, awareness, and adoption. ClearView provides a best-in-class software that can grow with your program, while not overwhelming your users.

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Lootok courts a BC software: We were smitten, and it scared us (Part III)

The Brit seemed like our perfect partner, and we feared it too good to be true—technical sophistication, strong reporting/metrics, and flexibility? Our self-defense mechanism kicked in, and we couldn’t help but try to dig up some dirt. So, we asked others, “Hey, what’s the Brit really like?”

But despite our best efforts, all we could scrape up were rave reviews from their existing clients. By all accounts, the Brit seemed reliable, stable, and drama-free.

Though it may seem shallow to admit, we also wanted to date someone with a pleasing, modern aesthetic—and the Brit was recognized globally for its good-looking user interface. Having seen so many clunky platforms, we bonded in our mutual love for user-centered design. We spent many a weekend waxing poetic about the need for “simple, unobtrusive, intuitive planning.”

No doubt our attraction had been instant.

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Lootok courts a BC software: It’s a Match! (Part II)

We’d been hurt before

Its a match

Years ago, we were seduced by software that promised to solve all of our problems. Maybe it was our fault for being too naïve. The software only ended up being way too complicated, and left us feeling so overwhelmed and abandoned that there was no choice but to eventually break up. The whole experience burned us so bad that we swore never to enter into the software market again.

Maybe we’d just been in the BCM scene too long, but we didn’t want anything flashy or something just “good enough.” Perhaps our standards were high, but we vowed to ourselves not to make the same mistake again.

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How do you create situation awareness—Fresh perspectives with Mica Endsley

I had the privilege of sitting down with Mica Endsley —author of Designing for Situation Awareness: An Approach to User-Centered Design. Mica is the president of SA Technologies. Previously she was the Chief Scientist for U.S. Air Force.

Mica shares with us lessons learned from her book—Designing for Situation Awareness. I asked her nine (9) questions to solicit her thoughts on situation awareness, technology, and mental models.

Mica Endsley
Mica Endsley

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Lootok courts a BC software: We were struggling (Part I)

For a long while, Lootok was happy being alone—we were a start up in New York City that was shaking up the industry. We were doing things that many thought were eccentric, even radical, but we beat the odds, changed perceptions, and emerged as an innovative force in the industry.

Throughout our 10-year existence, we remained single. A number of times, we were approached by other vendors, but we were wary of making any partnerships. Deep down, we feared doing so might compromise all the hard work and strides we had accomplished

NYC city skyline

 

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