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Part II | Perception: it’s like building a house vs. Reality: it’s like running a farm

Perception:

It’s like building a house

Reality:

It’s like running a farm

There are certain building blocks to any program, but how we approach risk management planning will inform our results from the start. Keeping an eye towards sustainability is key.

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Part I | Perception: people will believe vs. reality: people just don’t care

Perception:

People will believe

Reality:

People just don’t care

While there will be dozens of components to consider as we begin our risk management plan, the most vital is the people behind it. It can also be the most frustrating—people may not exactly be falling over themselves to volunteer for the team. Most people would agree that risk management is important, but there tends to be a lack of enthusiasm when it comes to building and implementation.

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5 fresh perspectives: seeing the world differently

Why do we even need a fresh perspective on BCM?

As we grow and learn from our experiences, observations, and interactions with other people, we form frameworks that help us understand the world around us and give us cues as to how to respond or behave. These frameworks give us our own personal blueprint as to how and why things work.

For example, most people have automatically come to understand that when your phone rings, you answer it and say, “Hello?” When someone sneezes, it’s likely you’ll hear someone else say, “Bless you.” If you want to make an omelet, you need to break a few eggs. Et cetera.

The problem is, frameworks are built on individual experience. And sometimes we get it wrong. And when we get it wrong, we’re presented with challenges that are extremely difficult for us to understand and negotiate.

This is the first in a series of e-books that examines the typical ways we’ve found people think about risk management. A fresh perspective is important, as many of the frameworks we’ve built around the process—as well as the product—tend towards the negative. Our goal is to identify how and why we’ve developed these frameworks so we can do something about them.

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How soon do you need to communicate after a crisis?

I was working with an executive team on a crisis scenario, when one of the leaders asked a question on crisis communication. He asked, “How soon do we need to communicate? 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, …?” He was looking for a precise number to evaluate a few past incidents that were on top of mind for everyone in the room. I gave the common answer, but right answer, of “it depends”. He gave a look of dissatisfaction and made a discrediting posture. I went on to share a few basic statistics from Daniel Diermier’s research (author of Reputation Rules) such as “online news stories suggest that the typical window is only eight hours; 20% of all news stories on a given issue are published within an eight-hour period; so forth.” Some time has passed since the exercise. After some thought, I want to provide executives with six (6) crisis characteristics to consider when determining when and how to communicate.

Crisis communication meeting
When should you communicate?

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Lootok lights up the RIMS’16 Go Beyond conference

Please join us at RIMS’ annual conference in San Diego, April 10-13, 2016.  Lootok’s CEO and President, Sean Murphy, will be speaking at three separate events. The schedule for his sessions is listed below.

You can also get a sneak peak of Sean’s session on “Five Essential Crisis Management Capabilities” live on Twitter through RIMS live tweet chat. Join the conversation by following and using #RIMS16Chat on March 9, 2016 at 2:00pm EST.

RIMS organization logo
RIMS’16 Go Beyond

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Debunking myth #5: Best-in-class BCM software exists

Will BCM software deliver on its promise of making your BCM program easier to run? Is it really possible for BCM software to eliminate the difficulties in running your program?

Yes, it can—but there’s a catch. It won’t address challenges that are unique to your program. Essentially, your problems need to be shared by every other customer of the software.

Download Best-in-class BCM software exists, the fifth myth in Lootok’s series on the five myths of business continuity management (BCM)!

Best-in-class BCM software exists
Myth #5: Best-in-class BCM software exists

See Myth #1: The plan is the promised land.
See Myth #2: You need a business impact analysis (BIA).
See Myth #3: The risk matrix measures risk.
See Myth #4: It gets cheaper and easier.

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What are the signs of an organization at risk for crises?

For some organizations, a crisis is the only catalyst for change.

Sharing a few thoughts on recognizing the signs of an organization at risk for crises. I have not performed a thorough analysis; however, I have a few reoccurring observations. I have observed three (3) common corporate attributes that lead to big corporate crises, which can be used to justify investments into our risk management programs—beyond credit, liquidity, and market risk:

  1. Incidents and near misses
  2. Targets and spending
  3. Incentives and self-regulation
person in crisis
Signs of a crisis

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