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Lootok CEO to share a revolutionary approach to crisis and risk management at two industry events

See Sean Murphy speak at OSAC Crisis Management Forum and APTA’s Risk Management Seminar this August


Sean Murphy, CEO of the crisis management and business continuity consulting and technology company Lootok, will share his expertise and insights at two high-profile events this year. On August 7, he will present at the American Public Transportation Association’s (APTA) Risk Management Seminar in San Diego. Immediately following the APTA Seminar, Murphy will be a featured speaker at the U.S. Department of State’s Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC)’s Crisis Management Forum in Minneapolis on August 8 and 9.

The APTA Risk Management Seminar is the only risk management seminar dedicated to risk management professionals involved in transit risk management. This year’s agenda features new and creative thinking for risk managers—presenting cutting-edge concepts and challenges. With transportation and public entity risk managers at all levels of experience, the seminar includes several sessions on issues that transit risk managers face on a daily basis. Sean Murphy’s session will explore a modern approach to crisis and business continuity management that allows companies to maneuver in today’s complex world of threats.

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Press release: Lootok and Nettitude partner to provide cybersecurity and crisis management services

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The threats impacting businesses today are complex, insidious, and almost always have an up or downstream impact on technology. Cyber attacks are also borderless and can impact core operations as easily as business partner and supply chain operations. Therefore, when companies look to increase their resiliency they must weigh equally their operational and technological vulnerabilities.

One challenge that many organizations face is that there is no single entity governing cybersecurity and crisis management. With different reporting structures, separate budgets, and uncoordinated planning, they struggle to stay in sync. This partnership takes aim at breaking down those silos and helping organizations to get an honest and holistic view of their risk landscape.

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Bringing play into the business world

Despite the occasional stuffed-shirt boss looking over my shoulder and saying “This isn’t playtime!” some of the best jobs I’ve ever had incorporate a level of playfulness, and the results have always proven to be effective.

A favorite exhortation among fast-food bosses is, “If you’ve got time to lean, you’ve got time to clean!” But a little leaning now and then, and even a little guided playfulness, can go a lot further towards getting employees actively engaged in a corporate goal than will any angry mandate.

Where employers and employees alike go wrong is falling into the trap of believing that work isn’t supposed to be fun. Sean Murphy, CEO and founder of Lootok, a crisis management and business continuity consulting and technology company, went into this business – which is normally as dry as a Prohibition-era liquor cabinet – with the idea of actually transforming it into something people actually want to do.

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Read the full article with commentary from Sean Murphy on HUFFPOST.

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When a nudge works better than a hammer

Changing a culture – whether it’s a country, a company, or a small group of friends – can’t be done by mandate alone, it has to be done with subtle nudging. King Mongkut, leader of Siam in the mid-19th century, also knew a thing or two about how to nudge people towards change, avoiding British colonialization not with battle, but by embracing modernization and the adoption of some Western customs. That’s why Thai people now eat with forks and spoons. Mongkut’s son, King Chulalongkorn, followed in his father’s footsteps, and adopted a spiffy style of dress that included stylish English suits and an Homburg.

Effecting change in peoples’ behavior, and changing long-held customs and practices isn’t an easy thing to do, whether you’re a world leader, the head of a Fortune 500 company, an entrepreneur with a small business, a schoolteacher, or anyone who is tasked with the difficult task of changing the way people think. Strong-arm tactics, mandates, and threats may work in the short-term, but seldom end well. According to Sean Murphy, CEO of Lootok, the “push” model is far less effective – a better approach is to change the conversation so that the people you seek to influence begin to demand the desired behavior. It becomes a “pull” model.

Read the full article with commentary from Sean Murphy on The Good Men Project.

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ClearView wins Global Best BCM Software Award for a record fifth time!

At the Business Continuity Awards ceremony held at the prestigious London Marriott Hotel, Grosvenor Square on 8th June, ClearView wins the Award for Best Business Continuity Management Software for a record fifth year in succession, against competition from around the world.

The judges praised the software for its role in helping organizations of all sizes in all parts of the world to achieve their BCM objectives; delivered and supported by a team with significant industry knowledge and with excellent customer service.

CIR: Business Continuity Awards 2017

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Contextual learning could soon replace traditional learning

Corporate training is big business. Last year alone, American organizations spent a whopping $70.65 billion on corporate training and associated administrative costs, based on data from Training magazine’s 2016 Training Industry Report. Most companies are willing to invest in the learning and development of employees because they must compete in ever-changing markets, which requires enhanced skills.

According to a McKinsey Quarterly survey, nearly 90% of organizations indicated that building on the capabilities of employees is a top priority. However, only around a quarter said that they can accurately measure the success of their learning programs in terms of improved performance. There seems to be a disconnect between investing in learning programs and having a direct understanding of the impact on the bottom line.

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Read the full article with commentary from Jeremy Stynes on HR Dive.

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Participatory learning dramatically improves employee career development

It’s a well-known fact that a strong corporate learning program is an effective retention tool.

By encouraging employees to actively participate, employees can better understand new concepts practically, rather than just absorbing a slew of information. Participatory learning can increase employee career satisfaction when it’s carried out correctly.

According to the National Institutes for Health, the very process of participating in any change activity can support workforce learning. A 2009 study conducted by E. Rosskam involved teaching employees new health procedures in order to improve safety. By using a shared platform where learners can interact and support one another, employees can perceive learning as something they own.

HR Dive talked with Sean Murphy, CEO of Lootok, a business continuity and crisis management firm with headquarters in New York City, about the concept of participatory learning. When employees buy in to active career development, this participation creates another layer in the experience.

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Read the full article with commentary from Sean Murphy on HR Dive.

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