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Crisis management: fly the plane or fix the problem, don’t do both

Learning to either manage the crisis or run the company, but not do both, is a hard lesson for most executives, as they want to do it all. Executives achieve their position through hard work, overcoming extreme obstacles, success, confidence, and leadership. It becomes difficult to let go of the organizational reigns to focus on the crisis. Likewise, it is just as difficult to let others manage a crisis while they focus on the organization. This post is a reflection of a number of executive crisis management trainings I facilitated where the executive (e.g., CEO, business unit president, segment leader) wanted to ‘fly the plane’ and ‘fix the problem.’

fix the plane

 

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How to bring crisis management back to the basics

This is a continuation of my Business Continuity Basics article.

Consider the Basics for Crisis Management Program - as with most initiatives and programs, we tend to over think when we design them. The basics reminds me of one of my favorite quotes from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, “Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

Let’s keep it simple: crisis management

When it comes to crisis management the majority of crisis teams need seven means to make timely and effective decisions based on applying judgment to available information. We need a command and control framework, critical information requirements (identification of gaps in our knowledge), intelligence, situation awareness, common operating picture, common ground, and intent.

Back to basics Lootok Crisis Management

 

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Join Lootok in Philly for RIMS 2017!

As you are making plans for the RIMS 2017 Conference in Philadelphia, make sure you don’t miss Lootok’s Sean Murphy and Jeremy Stynes speaking on Monday, April 24th. They will be exploring the psychology of risk, sharing innovative ways to market your program, and breaking down traditional myths of Business Continuity Management. All in our signature, non-conventional Lootok way. We hope you come and join us!

RIMS 2017: April 23-26th, 2017 | the Pennsylvania Convention Center | Philadelphia

Lootok Sessions on Monday, April 24 :
12:00 – 12:25 pm | Market Your Program Like a Product | Jeremy Stynes, President
1:00 – 1:25 pm | Five Myths of Operational Risk and Business Continuity Management | Sean Murphy, CEO
3:00 – 4:00 pm | Risk Shrink: Exploring the Psychology of Risk | Sean Murphy, CEO, Lootok; Hester Shaw, Internal Control Framework Director, GSK

Lootok Rims 2017 Philadelphia cheesesteak
Join Lootok for some juicy sessions on Business Continuity!

 

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The future of resiliency is not resiliency

Zona Walton [ADP - Global Business Resiliency] and I spoke at a private conference last month. The title of our session was The Future of Resiliency. We explored the idea that the future of resiliency isn’t resiliency; that is, it will be something else.

Lootok future of resiliency
The future of resiliency is not resiliency.

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Risky business: the risk matrix

Risky business: the risk matrix

In my previous two posts, I explored better ways of capturing your key assets, threats, and vulnerabilities. Now, we will take these ingredients and plot them on a risk matrix.

First, download Lootok’s risk matrix.

The risk martrix
The risk matrix

The risk matrix provides a way to think about the probability and consequences of risks. Typically, risk is measured using two variables: impact and probability, which make up the axes of matrix.

Both of these variables should be specifically defined before using the risk matrix to plot your risks. The first variable, impact, is a measure of how harmed or disrupted your business would be if the risk occurred. Impacts can occur across different areas, such as finance, regulation, or reputation. Within each impact area, a risk can cause a low or high impact.

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Risky business: Attackers and Defenders™

Risky business: Attackers and Defenders

Welcome back. In my previous post, I presented the first of three activities that Lootok uses to complete risk assessments.

Our second activity, Attackers and Defenders™, identifies threats and vulnerabilities. Remember: threats, vulnerabilities, and assets are the ingredients for a risk. Without these three ingredients, there is no risk. In this post, I will show you how to use this activity to identify your specific threats and vulnerabilities.

At Lootok we love Attackers and Defenders™ because it engages everyone in the room. It is competitive. It involves role-playing. It forces you to think creatively about your business, and most importantly it is fun, which is not a word often used in the same sentence as risk assessments and business continuity!

The Attackers and Defenders™ activity creates an environment for structured dialogue around your organization’s threats and vulnerabilities. The key objective of this activity is to define the threats and vulnerabilities facing your key assets. The activity helps you determine realistic threats to your assets, and the vulnerabilities that allow those threats to cause a disruption. You will also be asked to reach an agreed upon prioritization of your risks, complete with evidence that can be used for reporting, planning, and investment.

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Risky business: Value Map™

Risky business: Value map

In my previous posts about risk, I discussed why we need to consider it, why we have difficulty assessing it, and how to be more objective.

Next, I will explore a number of the activities that Lootok developed to help measure risk at your organization. The first activity is Lootok’s Value Map™. The Value Map™ helps you identify and visualize your organization’s assets. If you recall from the first post, an asset is one of the ingredients of risk.

The Value Map™ is exactly what it sounds like: a giant map on the wall depicting the environment for which you wish to do a risk assessment. The map can be a campus, a country, the globe, an IT map, a factory, or blueprints—whatever environment you wish to measure risk.

Lootok Value Map
Lootok Value Map™

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